Tag Archives: New York

Bhupendra Karia: ‘Listening to India with one’s eyes’

NEW YORK — India, with its complex history, mix of cultures and massive population, represents a world unto itself that is at once a force to be reckoned with on the global stage and an unknowable land to outsiders. It is this veil that artist, teacher, theorist, curator and photographer Bhupendra Karia sought to pierce, and in the process humanizes the nation with a unique, visual synecdoche that reflects his cultural awareness and personal vision.

Among the most striking images in the exhibit: A vertical B&W print of a turban, a shawl and a rifle hanging on peg embedded in a terra cotta wall. The deceptively simple image evokes India’s cultural identity (or one segment of it), its struggle for independence, and the violence of Partition in 1947 — when lands occupied by the British Empire were carved into Hindu and Muslim nations to form what is current-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Estimates of the death toll vary between 500,000 and 1.5 million, marking one of the most tragic periods in modern history.

Karia’s Population Crisis project produced views of urban life in Bombay (Mumbai), from the manual labor of men lugging cloth, tied in bundles, on their backs, to the quotidian hustle and bustle of commerce and transportation clogging the city’s streets in every direction, with such richness in its subjects to provide the viewer an immersion, however brief, into life in India; from food vendors preparing to distribute lunch orders in stacked tins from crudely constructed wooden carts, to residents making their way around tenement-style, colonial-era housing.

In the second half of the 1960s and the early 1970s, Karia undertook extensive photographic journeys that would last weeks, sometimes months, at a time, logging some 80,000 miles across India’s rural landscape — likely fueled by an anthropological impulse to explore and record rural India and its native creative traditions–textiles, pottery, and architectural decoration. The resulting project comprises a quarter-million images, which Karia edited down to a portfolio of 74 photographs that he called “the meager harvest of my first 20 years in photography.” Twenty of those images are included in the current exhibition, Bhupendra Karia / India 1968-1974, through March 19 at sepiaEYE, with selected work from the Karia Estate, comprises two projects, Selections from the Portfolio and Population Crisis.

Bhupendra Karia / India 1968-1974 at sepiaEYE, 547 W. 27th Street, #608, New York, NY, Feb. 4, 2016, through March 19, 2016.

Lecture: “An Evolving Archive: The Photographs of Bhupendra Karia with Paul Sternberger,” at International Center of Photography, 7 p.m., Wednesday, March 16.

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Bhupendra Karia, Population Crisis B.45.70, Bombay, early 1970’s, Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Population Crisis B.8.74.70, Bombay, early 1970’s, Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Population Crisis B.88.70, Bombay, early 1970’s. Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Population Crisis B.96.70, Bombay, early 1970’s. Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Population Crisis B.229, Bombay, early 1970’s. Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Old Bombay Dwellings, Bombay, 1970. Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Birdcage and Saris on Porch, Sankheda, 1967. Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Hand Print on Wall, 1968. Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Lamp and Two Umbrellas, Baroda, 1968. Vintage Silver print
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Bhupendra Karia, Turban and Gun, Bhavnagar, 1969. Vintage Silver print

MoMA offers its first free online photography class

NEW YORK — The Museum of Modern Art has launched its first online photography class titled “Seeing Through Photographs,” a six-part course offered through learning company Coursera.

MoMA describes it:

Led by Sarah Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, the course introduces learners to firsthand perspectives and ideas from artists and scholars about what a photograph is and the many ways in which photography has been used throughout history and into the present day: as a means of personal artistic expression; a tool for science and exploration; a method for documenting people, places, and events; a way of telling stories and recording histories; and a mode of communication and critique in our increasingly visual culture.

The course launched Feb. 10, 2016.

Top: Still from Vik Muniz: Equivalents, from Seeing Through Photographs. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art. Below: Screenshot of Coursera page.

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Wim Wenders on Walker Evans, Polaroids

Filmmaker Wim Wenders speaks with MoMA curator Josh Siegel about the inspiration for his 1974 film, “Alice in the Cities.”

The conversation is part of a retrospective of the German-born filmmaker, organized by the Museum of Modern Art.

The film exhibition runs March 2-17, 2015.

Documentary digs into NYC street photography

Cheryl Dunn casts a spotlight on nine decades of New York street photography — with some of the discipline’s best-known practitioners and a few unheralded ones — in her new documentary film, “Everybody Street.”

“If you want to get a really broad slice of humanity, you can find it in New York,” Dunn tells Wired. “Every kind of person is out there and I think that’s what’s attracted all these photographers.”

An image from 'Everybody Street.'
An image from ‘Everybody Street.’

The cast reads like a who’s-who of photographers known for their fleeting imagery of a different time in New York’s history and iconic imagery of the city’s inhabitants: Bruce Davidson, Elliott Erwitt, Jill Freedman, Bruce Gilden, Joel Meyerowitz, Rebecca Lepkoff, Mary Ellen Mark, Jeff Mermelstein, Clayton Patterson, Ricky Powell, Jamel Shabazz, Martha Cooper and Boogie, as well as historians Max Kozloff and Luc Sante.

The “Everybody Street” Vimeo page contains selected clips from the interviews, including one in which Meyerowitz responds to a question of what makes a good photograph.

“I hitchhiked to Mexico, and in Mexico I saw this. It’s a shooting gallery, and in the shooting gallery there’s a wooden trunk, and in the trunk is a baby who’s screaming. Probably the gunshots,” he said. “I mean, I was able to see that that there was kind of an overall thing, rather than just looking at the baby. So, I think early on, I kind of developed a sense of, you know, what might make an interesting photograph.”

via New Film Profiles NYC’s Greatest Street Photographers

Magnum Photos announces new members

Moises Saman was named the newest full member of Magnum Photos at the organization’s annual meeting in New York this week.

A former Newsday staff photographer, the Peruvian-born Saman focused on covering the post-9/11 world, spending time in Afghanistan, Iraq and other Middle Eastern countries. Leaving the New York-based newspaper, he became a freelancer with Panos Pictures in 2007 and has since received numerous awards from the likes of World Press Photo.

In 2010, he was invited to join Magnum Photos as a nominee.

Magnum Photos also announced new associate members Bieke Depoorter and Jérôme Sessini, and nominee Sohrab Hura.

The agency’s 67th annual meeting kicked off at International Center of Photography, with a reception for the Magnum Contact Sheets exhibition at MILK Gallery. The event concluded at NeueHouse.

via Magnum Photos Blog.

N.Y. cameraman wins $200,000 police settlement

News cameraman Philip Datz won a $200,000 settlement from the Suffolk County Police Department stemming from his 2011 arrest at the scene of an investigation.

“This settlement is a victory for the First Amendment and for the public good,” Datz said. “When police arrest journalists just for doing their job, it creates a chilling effect that jeopardizes everyone’s ability to stay informed about important news in their community. Journalists have a duty to cover what the police are doing, and the police should follow the law and respect the First Amendment to ensure they can do that.”

In addition to the monetary award, the county also agreed to implement a new training program and create a Police-Media Relations Committee, according to the National Press Photographers Association.

In a video of the arrest, Suffolk County Police Sergeant Michael Milton tells Datz repeatedly to “go away.”

“I’ve been doing this for 30 years,” Milton says. “There’s nothing you can hold over my head or anybody out there.”

via New York Photojournalist Wins $200,000 Settlement from Viral Video Incident 

Hindu deities brought to life, one at a time

Widely recognized amid everyday life in India, Hindu deities come to life in the work of photographer Manjari Sharma.

Traveling to Mumbai in February 2011, Sharma took three weeks and an estimated $3,000 to $4,000 to produce her first photograph in the “Darshan” series, according to a New York Times Lens Blog feature, titled “The Beauty and Chaos of the Gods.”

For Sharma, it’s a project that could take several lifetimes, given the multitude of Hindu deities to choose from.

“There are billions of gods and goddesses in Hindu mythology,” she told the Times. “I could be doing this till the day I die and not have done enough.”

The sensitive nature of working with religious figures, also, isn’t lost on Sharma.

“If these gods weren’t given the respect that they should be given or I had my own take, which was perceived as slander, it would be shut down,” she said. “I’m treading on really touchy waters. Fortunately, everyone is in sync with the understanding that I’m treating it with as much respect as I could, since I come from it.”

A Kickstarter campaign helped the Brooklyn-based photographer raise an additional $26,000 for the project.

Sharma was recently named among the winners of CENTER’s 19th Annual International Awards and will have her work exhibited in Santa Fe, N.M.

via Darshan 2011 Ganesha on Vimeo.

Tom Ford book spotlights stratospheric fashion career

NEW YORK (Fotophile.com) — It’s not often a fashion designer at the top of his game walks away from it all. But then, it’s not often the industry finds a Tom Ford, either.

“Tom Ford”

Since announcing last November that he would leave his position as creative director of Gucci Group and designer for Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent, Ford took the industry by surprise. Now, Rizzoli has published an oversized volume highlighting the illustrious designer’s decade-long career set for release 1 November 2004.

The book features more than 300 photographs providing evidence of Ford’s stratospheric career as a cutting-edge designer and sharp businessman. In his decade-long role at the helm of Gucci Group, the company increased sales from $230 million in 1994 to nearly $3 billion in 2003 and becoming the world’s leading luxury brand, while setting fashion trends as well.

Photos are provided by some of the world’s top image-makers, including Richard AvedonMario TestinoHelmut Newton,Annie LeibovitzHerb Ritts and Terry Richardson, among others. The deluxe edition comes slipcased in white cabra leather and retails for $350; a black, cloth-bound version (pictured) runs $125.

The book boasts contributions from top editors Greydon Carter of Vanity Fair, Anna Wintour of Vogue and Bridget Foley of W.

Ford, a native of Austin, Texas, who was raised in Santa Fe, N.M., has won numerous design awards, including four from the Council of Fashion Designers of America and five VH1/Vogue Fashion Awards.

Sotheby’s sets new records, spurs medium’s next phase

By LAURA HUMPHREY
Contributing Editor

NEW YORK (Fotophile.com) — To the delight of auction houses and many in the photo world, it has become accepted that each season sees auction records broken for the highest amount paid for a photograph. The previous record was set just a few months ago by Richard Prince‘s Untitled “Cowboy”(1989), which sold for nearly $1.25 million at Christie’s in November 2005.

The sale of photographs from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art at Sotheby’s on 14 February 2006 broke this record three times. Two important and rareAlfred Stieglitz photographs of Georgia O’Keefe, the “heroic” nude and a portrait of the artist’s hands, sold for $1.2 million and $1.3 million, respectively, without buyer’s premiums. This alone was cause for celebration, clapped hands, and raised eyebrows but seemed almost lackluster when compared to the evening’s sale of Edward Steichen‘s The Pond — Moonlight (1904). This piece, at just over 16 x 19 inches, sold for $2.6 million — essentially the total of the last three auction records added together. It was purchased by Peter MacGill of Pace/MacGill Gallery on behalf of a private client. The estimate, which Sotheby’s sets in accordance to current trends in the retail and auction markets, was $700,000 to $1 million.

Unlike the Prince photograph, there probably won’t be much debate over the high value given the Stiechen and Steiglitz photographs: Each is a rare print by a landmark artist. It can be argued that the Stiechen photograph is unique, given the painstaking process he undertook to create the soft light and layered colors of the night scene. On top of that, it would be hard to match the glowing dual provenance of these photographs having come from the Met out of its Gilman Paper Company acquisition.

While it was expected that the Stiechen would break the previous auction record, more of a surprise was the exorbitant prices paid for many of the lesser works of the sale. Most notably, a group of three Jaromir Funke print went for 18 times the top of the estimate given by Sotheby’s. The heated battle on the auction floor lead to a buyer’s price far and away above the typical values for top Funke prints on the retail market. The estimate was set at $5,000 to $7,000 but sold for $130,000, without buyer’s premiums, to a private client.

This means good things for Sotheby’s but may be mixed for private dealers and galleries. In this sale it practically became standard for each lot to sell for at least double its estimate. Yet comparable pieces for many of these expensive lots can be found on the retail market for prices much closer to the estimates. The main difference is that the photographs in this sale all came with such sterling provenance. Perhaps the most interesting result of this sale will be to see how galleries and dealers adjust the values of their wares, if at all.

Another aspect to consider is the role of the actual artists in the rapidly escalating auction market. Photographers tend to be more closely involved with the galleries that represent them than with auctions. Auction houses do receive works from artists’ estates, but more often auction consignments come from people other than the artist or estate. Case in point, the record-breaking Prince photograph was put up for sale at Christie’s by an anonymous consignor. Prince himself was so uninvolved in the process that he was, according to PDN, “at home wrestling with [his] 8-year-old daughter in [his] bed watching the World Series of Poker, eating the last of [their] Halloween candy” while his photograph made auction history.

This week witnessed a truly historical event for the esteem of photographs in the larger art market. While this record may not be broken for some time, it is clear that the photography market is on the rise. This will always be a good thing for collectors. But for many in the photo world, the question now is: Who will be able to cash in?

World Press Photo exhibit heads to United Nations

UNITED NATIONS (Fotophile.com) — Highlights from the 2005 World Press Photo international competition will go on display at the United Nations headquarters in New York on 3 May 2005.

This year’s winner, an image by Indian photographer Arko Datta of Reuters, shows a woman mourning the death of a relative who was killed in the Asian tsunami catastrophe triggered by a massive underwater earthquake off the coast of Indonesia.

The series of resulting tsunamis, reaching as far as Somalia and Tanzania, killed approximately 300,000.

World Press Photo jury chairman Diego Goldberg described the winning image as “a true spot news picture with a strong photographer’s point of view.”

The U.N. exhibit will run through 6 June 2005.

For his win, Datta received 10,000 euro at the awards ceremony on 24 April 2005 in Amsterdam and a Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II camera.

A record 4,266 professional photographers from 123 countries entered 69,190 images in the annual World Press Photo contest. It was also the first time the competition was entirely digital.

Winners this year in other categories include J.F. Diorio of Brazil for his image of a girl shielding her eyes as fire rages through her favelaKristen Ashburn of the U.S. for her stark post-mortem portrait of a Palestinian man killed by an Israeli sniper; James Nachtwey of the U.S. for his timeless picture of a Sudanese refugee; and David Guttenfelder of the U.S. for his daily life pictorial of women casting ballots in Afghanistan’s first-ever direct presidential election.

Sports photographers Bob Martin of the United Kingdom won for his image of a Spanish swimmer in the Paralympics and Adam Pretty of Australia for his photograph of Olympic swimmers. Daniel Silva Yoshisato of Peru won for his feature story on the Peruvian women’s soccer team.

Francesco Zizola of Italy won for his portrait of a Ugandan refugee; Tommaso Bonaventura of Italy for his sweeping, dramatic image of Russians on pilgrimage; and Jahi Chikwendiu of the U.S. won for a picture of a massive sandstorm in the Darfur region of Sudan.